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Watch Details

water resistance introduction

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water resistance introduction

Nowadays we take for granted that most watches are water resistant and by that we assume that we could deep dive with them. Reality is that water resistant watches are relatively new (early XX century) and that it is not possible to dive with many of them. In fact, only some of the so called water resistant watches can be used for diving depending on their level of resistance to water pressure.

In fact, there are no waterproof watches, but there is always a limit to the level of water pressure a watch can withstand. In a water resistant watch this limit is generally clearly indicated either in the dial or in the back of the case and it is expressed either in meters, feet or atmospheres. If the watch does not indicate the limit but just that it is “water resistant” then the only thing one can do with it is washing his/her hands. Conversely, the limit indicated gives a clear direction about what is possible to do or not to do with the watch.     

Unfortunately, the indication of the limit is not clear and for some people it might even be misleading. The following section underlines the meaning of water resistance and what to look at in order to ensure we make the best use of our watches.

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Elements of a Leather Strap

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Elements of a Leather Strap

If you are after a classic look then you must own a wristwatch with a leather strap. Leather straps, in fact, are a must for the most classic wristwatches though they can also fit casual and even sport models. Thanks to the incredible variety of types of leather and related treatments, it is possible to manufacture straps from the most classic to the most sporty one. Natural leather is the most prestigious and flexible material that can be used for a wristwatch strap. As such, we thought it might be interesting to underline the many elements that contradistinguish leather straps.

 

The different elements of a leather straps can be classified into the following categories: material, finish and treatment, padding and stitching, structure and closure. For the purpose of this chapter we are not going to cover the closure but if interested you might check our chapter Buckles and Claps. The following section briefly covers the other elements of a leather strap.

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Clasp and Buckle

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Clasp and Buckle

The closure is the most understated yet the most instrumental element of a wrist watch. Without a closure, in fact, a traditional wristwatch cannot be secured to the wrist - with the exception of bangle watches. Despite this key function only few people pay attention to it and only few watchmakers focus on this element to express their creativity.

Wristwatch closures can be classified mainly into two classes: clasp and buckle closures. Clasps are generally used on bracelets made of rigid material (e.g. metal, ceramic...) though lately they been used also for straps made of soft materials (e.g. leather, canvas…). On the other hand buckles, because their intrinsic structure, are used only on straps made of soft materials.

The following sections underline the different types of claps and buckles.

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Watches for Every Style and Occasion

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Watches for Every Style and Occasion

People tend to behave and present themselves differently depending on the specific situation. The intrinsic nature of a person does not change however he/she might be perceived differently for example at formal event vs an informal party with close friends or family. The difference in perception is essentially driven by two elements: the behavior itself and the presentation/look of the person. In fact people tend to define their look depending on the specific occasion while always keeping to certain extent a link to their overall personal style.

Jewelry and watches are an integral part of the look of a person and as such they are generally chosen based on both the personal style and the specific occasion. Some people might even be able to afford a collection of watches to use in different occasions. The people who cannot afford a collection tend to buy a watch that fits their personal style and tends to be versatile enough to be used for multiple occasions. For simplicity we frame the different kind of watches based on the three main styles and the three main occasions. However, reality is much more complicated and styles/occasions don’t always have a clear cut.

Notably the people with a sporting style tend to use the same watch for multiple occasions or sometimes they just use sport watches of different quality/manufacture for different occasions. The following sections underline the differences between the different types of watches.

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Chronographs, Chronometers and Certifications

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Chronographs, Chronometers and Certifications

The three Cs: Chronograph, Chronometer and Certification are among the most discussed words in the horology industry but not always well understood by the broader public. In fact, the first two Cs are often confused – both words start with “chrono” which comes from Greek and means nothing more than “time”. However, the second part of the word is what makes the drastic difference in meaning. Chronometer, in fact, refers simply to the measure (Greek “metron”) of time (Greek “chrono”) and is used to identify watches with high accuracy. On the other hand, chronographs are part of the so called movements with complications and are intended to feature not only hours and minutes but also other measures (generally on secondary sub-dials). This means that a chronometer might be associated with a chronograph but this last might not necessarily be a chronometer. Finally “certification” generally applies to the chronometers and we will see specifically which one, how and why.

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Tourbillon – King of watch “Complications”

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Tourbillon – King of watch “Complications”

The most expensive watches tend to have movements capable of measuring more than just the passage of time in hours and minutes. Those extra measures are achieved via the so called “complications” or "grand complications" when several of them are combined together. Common complications in commercial watches are day/date displays, alarms, and chronographs. Other complications might include: perpetual calendars, rattrapante chronographs, sonneries, moon phases, 24 hour dials and multiple time zones. The higher is the number of complications the more difficult is the overall process of designing, making and assembling the movement especially considering the space constraints and this ultimately drives the higher cost of the resulting luxury timepiece.

Most people, however, define complications also other mechanisms that do not add new measures but still increase the complexity of the overall watch movement. Some of those are intended to improve watch accuracy or make the movement more interesting while in operation. In this context the “king” of the complications even if not technically a complication is the tourbillon (or tourbillon escapement). 

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Watch Bands - Metals and Treatments

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Watch Bands - Metals and Treatments

With the move from pocket watches to wristwatches a new element had to be taken in consideration – the watch band or fastening element in general. The first watch bands (or watch straps) were made of leather, textile or metal then followed by rubber and other more innovative materials. The most exclusive watches tend to have either leather straps or metal bands. Metal bracelets are in general the most durable ones and wear well in all kinds of weather conditions and usage occasions. Their lifespan might be as long as the one of the watch itself while all other kind of bands/straps might require replacement over more or less long periods of time. In this chapter we will focus on the metal bands and explore some important factors to consider when choosing the type of metal and treatment (other materials might be covered in future posts).

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Watch Movements – Beginners Guide

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Watch Movements – Beginners Guide

We all use a watch, whether a wristwatch, a wall-clock or a watch in the mobile phone. However, only few really know how a modern wristwatch measures the passage of time. Watches are very complex machines and most of the documents meant to explain how watch movements and mechanisms work are often difficult to understand and/or to assimilate. On the other hand the mechanic of most common watches is based on very simple principles not that difficult to understand and assimilate. Under this optic, watch movements can be explained in a very simple way and “beginners guide” should start from explaining those overall principles.

We will try to simplify as much as possible the explanation and clarify the way watches measure the passage of time. In a second phase we will go a bit more in details so to familiarize with the most common parts of a watch but we will not cover every single part of a watch movement. Before doing that, let’s clarify that for the purpose of this article we will consider only three types of watch movements: manual and automatic movements and quartz watches. Manual and automatic movements are called mechanical as they are made of only mechanical parts like gears and springs. On the other hand the quartz movements have an electrical circuit but may also have some mechanical parts. 

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Quartz Watches

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Quartz Watches

A wristwatch is generally made of five parts: i) a clockface which shows the timing, ii) a mechanism that measure the passage of time, iii) the gears that link the clockface to the mechanism iv) a source of energy and v) the case and bracelet.

The most common watches are either mechanical (manual or automatic) or quartz and the main difference between them resides in the source of energy and the way the passage of time is measured.

In the mechanical watches the energy is generated by either a manual winding or by the natural motions of the wearer's body which activate a series of gears that measure the passage of time and also drive the hands in the clockface.

Like the mechanical watch, also the so called quartz watch has gears inside to count the seconds, minutes, and hours and to sweep the hands around the clockface. However, the gears are regulated by an electric circuit instead of a mechanical one. In the watch there is a battery which sends electricity to a quartz crystal. The crystal oscillates at a precise frequency and generates regular electric pulses (one per second) that can drive a small electric motor to turns gear wheels to spin the clock's second, minute, and hour hands. Alternatively the pulses might power an LCD display.

The so called crystal oscillator creates a signal with very precise frequency, so that quartz watches are at least an order of magnitude more accurate than mechanical watches. The first quartz watch was built in 1927 and in the 80s they become more compact and inexpensive, and thanks to their precision they are now the world's most widely used timekeeping technology.

Todd & Marlon believe that every second count and having an accurate view of the time is a must. For their first timepiece Todd & Marlon have then selected a Swiss Made movement because of the quality and Quartz for its reliability and accuracy. This specific caliber is made of hundreds of parts (including 1 jewel) and it has been customized to fit the specific 24 hour dial of #YOURTIME watch.

A 24 hour watch works exactly as a common (12 hour) watch with the only difference that in this kind of watch there is one hand that completes a rotation in 24 hours instead of 12 hours. Most of the 24 hour watches have two hands to indicate the hours: one is based on the standard of 12 hours while the second one completes the rotation in 24 hours. Some have only one hand to indicate the hours and this is the 24 hour hand. In the first collection of Todd & Marlon the watches have only one hand indicating the hours (24 hour) in order to keep it clean and simple.

 

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SAPPHIRE CRYSTAL and GLASSES - CHOICE and VALUE

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SAPPHIRE CRYSTAL and GLASSES - CHOICE and VALUE

The clear cover of a watch's face is usually referred to as the crystal - the crystal is the eye of the watch and through it one might see its soul! This element is designed to protect the dial and inner movement of the watch and needs to resist scratching and rupture.

The first portable watches like the ones manufactured by Peter Henlein at beginning of XVI-century were not provided of crystal. Those early watches were, instead, using a metal element or cage to protect the hands and the watch movement. The crystal has been introduced only at a later stage and sometimes still in combination with an external metal cage (e.g. Waltham WWI wristwatch).

Since then many different materials have been explored to protect the watch phase. Sapphire crystal has been introduced around 1930 but broadly adopted by luxury timepieces only over the last 30 years (driven by Rolex).  The main reason for the slow adoption was the manufacturing complexity and the cost associated. 

 

In this chapter we cover the different types of watch crystals as well as the manufacturing process of sapphire crystal. 

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Diamond Like Carbon

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Diamond Like Carbon

Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is a class of amorphous carbon material that displays some of the typical properties of diamond. DLC is usually applied as coatings to reduce abrasive wear in the engines of modern supersport motorcycles, Formula 1 racecars, NASCAR vehicles and in general only in high value items considering the inherent cost and difficulty in finding companies able to deliver good quality DLC.

DLC is used in #YOURTIME watches in order to make them super resistant to abrasive wear so that the black color can stand the test of time. In the video you might see the “cutter test” executed on the case of #YOURTIME watch. Despite the harsh cutter test, the black color stays on and the timepiece does not show any sign of scratches. This does not mean that DLC is immune to scratches but only that it resists to most of them and better than other treatments. In fact not all luxury brands use DLC – most of the luxury timepieces are actually treated with PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) which is good but not as resistant as DLC – Todd & Marlon are bringing you the best of the best of luxury!

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Swiss Precision

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Swiss Precision

#YOURTIME has been carefully crafted for the people who want to seize the day no matter what. With a 24 hours dial this unique timepiece allows you taking your time and enjoying every moment of the day. Having the entire day at a glance also helps better planning and organizing events – perfect for a busy person or someone who wants to live life to the fullest!

Every second count and having an accurate view of the time is a must. For their first timepiece Todd & Marlon have selected a Swiss Made movement because of its quality and a Quartz mechanism for its reliability and accuracy over time. This specific caliber is made of hundreds of parts (including 1 jewel) and it has been customized to fit the specific 24H dial of #YOURTIME watch.

A pure concentrate of Swiss Precision! 

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Italian Design

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Italian Design

Enjoying the day might take many different angles and a robust and solid watch is paramount. #YOURTIME is the perfect timeless companion for every venture. Fiery and intense the first Todd & Marlon timepiece showcases Italian Design and Swiss Precision.

#YOURTIME has a Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) treatment for achieving a super resistant black matte finish, it has the most resistant crystal made of Sapphire and just to make sure every moment is viable the watch is also resistant to water (10atm/100m).

Handsomely crafted #YOURTIME iconic shape has been designed to suit sport, casual and business situations. The 38mm case has a sophisticated and elegant silhouette yet it is boldly shaped to resist extreme activities. The dial is made of two layers brushed in different contrasting directions to underline the difference between day and night hours as emphasized also by the sleek silver sun and moon icons applied at noon and midnight positions respectively. The custom made bracelet with Diamond Like Carbon treatment subtly reminds the brand logo.

Impeccable Italian Design! 

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24 hour timepiece

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24 hour timepiece

The natural day/night division of a day is the reason why each day is split into two 12 hours cycles. The Egyptian used to have a 12 hour sundial for the day and 12 hour water clock for night time. 

Since then many different types of watches have been developed: some with 2 x 12 hour dial (i.e. double-XII system) others with 24 hour dial. However, the dial that became the norm has only 12 hour marks and its cycle is repeated twice during the day.

We believe that a watch should reflect the natural day/night division hence shows a 2 x 12 hour dial. #YOURTIME
 is a 24 hour watch - this means that the hour hand complete a full rotation every 24 hours. The dial shows the anti-meridian (am) hours on the left hand side and the post-meridian (pm) hours on the right hand side. The zenith for the sun is reached at 12:00 and is at the top of the dial.

Having the entire day at a glance also helps better planning and organizing events – perfect for a busy person or someone who wants to live life to the fullest!

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